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Patience, persistence, and a willingness to grow

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 22:45


George Couros, Connected Principals, Nov 22, 2016

There's this common belief among innovators and thought leaders that if other people do the same thing they did, they can achieve the same results. That's true to some extent - if you read and write newsletters for fifteen years like I did, you'll attain a similar base of knowledge. But in other important ways it's not. Here's George Couros: "like every other person who starts on Twitter, I had had a network with the same amount of people that everyone else starts with; zero.   A network takes time, persistence, and effort, to develop." This is true, but another principle of networks is that if you put in the same effort Couros did ten years ago, you will not get the same result. You will get a much smaller result. Networks favour the first moverYou would have to go back in time to do the same thing Couros did. The only way around this is to find something that's just starting now, and run with it for a decade. What if it's the wrong thing? Well, tough luck. The best you can do is to cast your net really wide and work a lot harder than Couros did.

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Categorías: General

Free Arabic-language online courses thrive in popularity

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 22:45


Rahilla Zafar, Financial Times, Nov 22, 2016

Some nice news about MOOCs working as intended. "The platform reports that it has more than 900,000 registered users with figures growing by 1,000 a day and reaches people in 22 countries in the Middle East and north Africa. The majority of students come from Egypt, Jordan, Algeria, Saudi Arabia and Morocco." I've seen  the platform called Raaq, Edraaq, Raak, and Rawaq.

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Academic rankings: The university’s new clothes?

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 22:45


Yves Gingras, University Affairs, Nov 22, 2016

I have said on numerous occasions that things like university rankings are a lobbying tool, not a measuring tool. Organizations take the values they want to see emulated and grade the universities according to them. This is the gist of this article from Yves Gingras, once you skip past the extended retelling of the time-worn tale of the emperor's new clothes. "We must go beyond the generalities of those who repeat ad nauseam that 'rankings are here to stay' – without ever explaining why this must be so – and open these 'black boxes' in order to question the nature and value of each and every indicator used to assess research at a given scale."

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Report: Education Department's IT Security is 'Not Generally Effective'

Campus Technology - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 22:06
The United States Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General has found in a recent report that the department’s overall information technology security is “not generally effective” in meeting several federal requirements.

Check Out This Moodle “Armor Bundle” Of Plugins

Moodle News - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 15:32
With the diversity that characterizes the Moodle plugins to solve even the issues you don’t realize you have, the process of selecting and evaluating can become taxing. Some special editions,...

Post-Truth And Fake News

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 10:37

Yes, by all means, do something about the fake news that is propagating through Facebook and Twitter. But let's not forget that we have been in the post-truth era for some time (indeed, one wonders whether we ever entered the truth era in the first place).

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Categorías: General

Ria #34: David Brightman On Being A Book Editor

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 10:37


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Nov 22, 2016 In this episode, David Brightman shares about his experiences as a book editor and described what he looks for in successful book proposals. [Link] [Comment]

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With its new app, RadioPublic wants to tackle podcasting’s lingering challenges

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 10:37


Shan Wang, Nieman Lab, Nov 22, 2016

It's like Ed Radio, but written by real programmers and available to whole communities. RadioPublic has three objectives: "improving show discovery, improving how (and how deeply) listeners engage with their favorite shows, and improving channels through which show creators can make money." It was  introduced Friday. It's avaiulable for iOS and Android. "We are featuring curated episode playlists across myriad topics, activities, moods, genres, artists, publishers, and networks." That's great - but I don't want to do my curating on a phone. Still. Installing. Listening. Via Ben Werdmuller.

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The role of higher education in reducing inequity: Using tuition, drop-out rates, and opportunity hoarding

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 10:37


Mark Guzdial, Computing Education Blog, Nov 22, 2016

Good post explaining why simply providing access to an education isn't enough to address income inequality. First, let's look at the cost of education in the first place and the load it places on people. "One of saddest features of US higher education economics today: many  of the kids saddled with higher education debt don’ t even graduate!" But even if you graduate, you need more than an education. "Rich kids who drop out of high school do as well  as poor kids who complete college? Opportunity hoarding makes it difficult to really move the needle in terms of addressing economic inequity." I've called this 'the Yale advantage' in the past and it represents one of the core inequalities online learning needs to address. Otherwise, it becomes just a means of entrenching the status quo.

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Analytics Literacy is a Major Limiter of Ed Tech Growth

OLDaily - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 10:37


Michael Feldstein, e-Literate, Nov 22, 2016

Substantial and weighty article from Michael Feldstein dealing with the topic of the day south of the border: the failure of analytics. Or, I guess, we should call it the failure of people to understand analytics, raising "the question of whether we put too much faith in numerical analysis in general and complex  learning analytics in particular." This is an oft-made critique, of course (we see it also, for example, in criticisms of grades and test scores). But Feldstein also suggests that it represents "a fundamental limiter on the future growth of the ed tech industry." I think this is true only if you think that ed tech is fundamentally an analytics industry. Many of my colleagues think it is. But I disagree. But do take the time to read this article - it's literate, informed, and as a well-formed opinion should, goes well beyond the data.

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Work With Source Codes Inside Moodle With This Plugin

Moodle News - 22 Noviembre, 2016 - 09:32
With the Virtual Programming Lab plugin, or VPL, Moodlers including students have access to a source code editor and console for a variety of software applications in many programming languages...

Entrevista a Sergi del Moral

Educació Demà - 21 Noviembre, 2016 - 18:15
"A mesura que el docent aplica metodologies noves, necessita canviar els espais perquè els tradicionals poden ser una limitació"

L'Ara Criatures fa ressò de l'Edcamp Mataró

Educació Demà - 21 Noviembre, 2016 - 18:10

Ahir el suplement Criatures del diari Ara, dedicat a les notícies sobre educació i criança, va reservar un espai a l'Edcamp Mataró.

Llegiu l'article aquí

 

The next generation...

Learning with 'e's - 21 Noviembre, 2016 - 16:16
My current cohort of computing and ICT specialists during a seminarA new breed of teachers is emerging. This next generation of educators are just as determined to make a difference as previous generations of teachers. The difference with this generation of educators though, is that they have a huge array of new technologies and tools, and they know how to use them. I know, it's a generalisation, but many of this new breed of educators are excellent at using technology to create new and exciting environments and opportunities for learning, and they are just as capable of creating great opportunities without those technologies. The secret to their future success will rely on their belief in relevant pedagogies that place their students at the centre of the learning process. This has not always been the case, and there remains widespread practice in schools around the world where students are considered to be 'products' or at best, passive participants, in the educational process. The next generation of teachers are also more willing to share their ideas with their peers - and again, the technology they have available allows them to do this freely.

Some of our recent graduates, now qualified teachersLet me introduce you to one of my former students - Neil Jarrett. Neil is now a primary teacher at an international school in Thailand. He was one of my computing and ICT specialists, and he was always excited about discovering ways technology could be used to enrich and enliven students' experiences. He is also keen on sharing his ideas and expertise within the professional community. Neil's most recent article for the Times Education Supplement outlines some great ideas for how teachers can embed new technology into any of their lessons. In another previous article for Teach Primary magazine Neil outlined some of the ways teachers can improve their assessment methods by using technology. These are very readable articles that clearly highlight some of the practical uses of technology to not only improve learning for students, but also to alleviate time and pressure issues for teachers.

Each year, as I see my latest crop of trainee teachers qualify and enter into qualified teacher status, I'm gratified for all the hard work we put into developing them as professionals. I'm also excited and optimistic for what is to come, because in the hands of enthusiastic and passionate teachers like Neil Jarrett, the future of education looks very bright indeed.

Photo by Steve Wheeler


The next generation by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.Posted by Steve Wheeler from Learning with e's

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