agregador de noticias

NYU Targets Fortune 500 Company Employees in New Emerging Technology Course

Campus Technology - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 22:54
Technology issues that challenge large corporations will be the focus of a new online graduate-level course offered by NYU's engineering school.

Job offered: Open University Seeks Technical Developer

Moodle News - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 16:00
The Open University, one of the largest Moodle installations in the world is looking to fill a full-time position on it’s Learning Systems...

U California Davis Courses Earn A-G-Approval

Campus Technology - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 15:10
A California university program has earned the seal of approval for its K-12 and college STEM-related courses, allowing students to use the grades they earn in those classes to help prove they've fulfilled some of the admission requirements for the University of California.

NDN Consortium Works To Replace Internet with Newer Model

Campus Technology - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 15:05
Last week an international group of academic and industry people converged for a two-day community meeting at the campus of the University of California Los Angeles to lay out more details of NDN — Named Data Networking.

Scalable Launches Ed Versions of Network Simulation Platforms

Campus Technology - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 15:00
Scalable Network Technologies has launched educational versions of its latest QualNet and EXata network simulation programs.

Moodle 2.7.2, 2.6.5 and 2.5.8 have been released

Moodle News - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 14:40
Moodle 2.7.2 has been released with several small enhancements and upgrades to the software. Improvements include several fixes to stats and the gradebook in addition to Atto (both autosave and...

Today: International Literacy Day 2014

Cátedra UNESCO de E-Learning de la UOC - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 12:02

Literacy plays a crucial role in the creation of prosperous and peaceful societies. As an exemple to address the global problem of illiteracy which strikes many regions within the developing world and frustrates their development perspectives, the 2000 Dakar Framework for Action set the goal to increase literacy levels worldwide by 50 percent by the year 2015. Yet millions of adults and young learners around the world continue to struggle with low reading, writing and math skills. What proven innovative practices might be brought to scale?

Debate at WISE 2013 Summit

The Launch of Twitter’s Analytics Service

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00
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Brian Kelly, UK Web Focus, [Sept] 08, 2014

Twitter has launched a new analytics service. Here's the announcement. Brian Kelly: "the service provides statistics on tweets (potential impressions, engagement and engagement rate). Additional tabs provide information on followers (changes in the numbers of followers and profiles of their gender,  location and interests) and Twitter cards." I'm not sure I even want this. Reading  my analytics made me feel like I did when I had Klout, bemoaning the fact that I had 0 interactions today (when I should be celebrating) and striving to make the number bigger, as if it mattered. But if I did want this, honestly, I'd want it for my whole network, not just network. But that means Twitter would have to share, and I don't think it knows how to do that any more.

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Balance is an Illusion

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00
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Tim Klapdor, [Sept] 08, 2014

This isn't directly related to educational technology, but it's a point that lies at the foundations of how we thing, and it's important to address a misconception. Tim Klapdor writes, "For many of us balance has become a pervasive goal in our lives.... The problem is balance is a state so infinitesimal, so fleeting and ephemeral that it is more like a mirage than an object." He's talking about things like work-life balance, but the influence of balance is global, informing everything from the way water settles to (for example) the 'settling' phenomenon in neural networks. Balance, as Klapdor says, isn't a state, but that doesn't mean it's an illusion. It's an  attractor - and when you start finding yourself with complex systems, it's a strange attractor, doing the  drunkard's walk (which is what makes sports so interesting) (it's like if you roll a marble in a hole - gravity makes the bottom of the hole an attractor; it influences the direction of the marble - but if you have more than one planet and varying gravity, then what counts as the 'bottom' is always changing, and so therefore are the influences on the roll of the marble).

 

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Licence information in schema.org and LRMI

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00
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Phil Barker, Sharing, Learning, [Sept] 08, 2014

The LRMI (Learning Resources Metadata Initiative) had from the start a property called useRightsUrl, "The URL where the owner specifies permissions for using the resource." But as Phil Basrker notes, Schema.org skipped useRightsURL when it adopted most of the LRMI properties, pending further review. Then last June, it adopted a  rights property which, says Barker, does everything LRMI wants. "It does everything that LRMI wanted by way of identifying the URL of the licence under which the creative work is released," he writes,  but also it "allows one to encode the name, url, description, date, accountable person and a whole host of other information about the licence."

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A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Coursera

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00
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Jonathan Mayer, Web Policy, [Sept] 08, 2014

Coursera is learning yet another lesson learned long ago by real LMS providers: you can't fake your way to privacy and security; you have to have real measures in place. Stanford's Jonathan Mayer identifies three major flaws:

  1. Any teacher can  dump the entire user database, including over nine million names and email addresses.
  2. If you are  logged into your Coursera account, any website that you visit can  list your course enrollments.
  3. Coursera’ s privacy-protecting user IDs don’ t do much privacy protecting.

To follow up, he writes, "Coursera has acknowledged the issues, and claims they are “ fully addressed.” The second vulnerability, however, still exists." Via Audrey Watters.

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Reflections on community in #rhizo14 – more questions than answers

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00


Frances Bell, Francesbell's Blog, [Sept] 08, 2014

A lot of people continue to value community in courses without, I think, comprehending what community is. It's really hard to understand the nature of a community from within. "How can we know about all of the flowers that bloomed? And some of the ones that failed to thrive or died?" Most people, I think, participate in community from their own frame of reference. Bell writes, for example, of Keith Harmon thinking of "the social network involved a social contract." So he sees rules, while by contrast, Bell "didn’ t see the rules that he refers to in #rhizo14 and would not really expect to see them." Or contrast this: "‘ Caring’ is identified as a distinguishing feature of community," which I think characterizes Dave Cormier's view. Is it any surprise, then, that community is characterized by dichotomies - " theorist/pragmatist ‘ divide’ , academics/ others" -? Do we have to agree on what a community is before participating in one? I don't think so (and this probably distinguishes me from pretty much everyone else on the topic - but they'll come around). Do read this discussion thread.

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Flipping Grade 4 and Flipping Bloom's Taxonomy Triangle

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00
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Maggie Hos-McGrane, Tech Transformation, [Sept] 08, 2014

I'm no fan of taxonomies but I'm a fan of the thinking behind this post. By 'flipping' Bloom's taxonomy, we get an approach to education that does not begin with remembering, it ends with remembering. And (I would add) the objective of such an education isn't remembering at all (and certainly not remembering some sort of core content); that's an outcome, but it isn't what we're striving for, necessarily. To quote Maggie Hos-McGrane: "Bergmann and Sams write: "Flipped learning is a bridge from traditional teaching methods which are heavily dependent on content, to more engaging learning methods that focus primarily on the acts of thinking and learning.""

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Twitter, algorithms, and digital dystopias

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00
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Doug Belshaw, [Sept] 08, 2014

So what happened after people exchanged their RSS readers for services like Twitter and Facebook? "What’ s so problematic about all of this, of course, is that whereas we used to be in charge of our own reading habits, we’ ve outsourced that to algorithms. That means software with shareholders is dictating our information environment." A bunch of good links on the topic: " Don’ t Be a Platform Pawn by Alan Levine led me to Frank Chimero’ s From the Porch to the Street and then onto a post about The Evaporative Cooling Effect which, in turn, cites this paper." p.s. Can I say I knew this would happen? Of course I can.

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Weeknote 36/2014

OLDaily - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 11:00
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Doug Belshaw, [Sept] 08, 2014

Doug Belshaw has interviewed a number people (including me) over the last week or so on the topic of the Mozilla Web Literacy Framework. He writes, "I’ m starting the ball rolling towards a v2.0 update of the Web Literacy Map (which looks prettier here in the Webmaker resources section). To do this, I’ m recording the conversations and posting the audio together with a summary on this blog. Below is a list of the 15 people I’ ve talked to this week, together with links to the recordings – where I’ ve had time to process them. You can find the repository on archive.org."

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Learning Layers at ECER’14 – Part 1: The VETNET opening session

Pontydysgu - Bridge to Learning - 8 Septiembre, 2014 - 09:18

Last week the Learning Layers (LL) project was strongly present at the European Conference on Educational Research (ECER’14) in Porto, Portugal. This year the conference celebrated the 20th anniversary of the founding of the umbrella organisation European Educational Research (EERA) that is in charge of the annual ECER conferences. The overarching theme was “Past, Present and Future of European Educational Research”. In a similar way the EERA network for European Research in Vocational Education and Training (VETNET) took the theme “Past, Present and Future of VET Research in Europe and Beyond” for its Opening Colloquium.

As part of this Opening Colloquium I was invited to give a short presentation on the development European research in workplace learning. Originally this task was planned for two other researchers with mutually complementing approaches. As their substitute I chose to focus on the legacy of the Work Process Knowledge network – a topic that I have also brought into discussion in the first Theory Camp session of the Learning Layers project.

I first looked at the history of the network from the unfunded phase (before 1996) to the first funding period as a European network under the EU 4th Framework Programme of Research (Targeted Socio-Economic Research) to the second funding period as a transnational project on Organisational Learning under the EU FP5. During all these phases the network brought together researchers from a wide range of disciplines including ergonomics, psychology of work, VET pedagogists, industrial sociologists, organisational researchers … For the VETNET network it was important that the network was strongly present in ECER conferences from 1978 (Ljubljana) to 2006 (Geneva).

The main point of interest for us was to look at the work of a Europe-wide interdisciplinary network that focused on skilled workers’ participation in and co-shaping contribution to innovations in working life. Here, the network did not try to make an a priori agreement on one overarching umbrella theory under which it would subsume its contributions. Instead,  it organised several sets of case studies and parallel to this worked with a common interpretative framework.

The main sources for developing the framework were field studies and comparative studies of the following kind:

  • studies on organisational innovations (e.g. including the introduction of quality circles) in which skilled workers’ participation and co-shaping contribution became manifest;
  • studies on new manufacturing concepts (e.g. transition from conveyor belt to ‘production islands’) that gave skilled workers’ collective responsibility new importance,
  • studies on hybrid qualifications and new emergining occupations (e.g. the integrative maintenance competences) that required crossing boundaries between traditional occupational fields.

With the overarching concept “Work Process Knowledge” the network drew attention  to the  acquisition of new kind knowledge in the context of innovations:

  1. acquisition of work process knowledge as a whole – not merely as new ‘procedural knowledge’
  2. balanced look at the role of informal learning (by-product of designed activities) and formal learning (taking up the learning gains of informal learning);
  3. the possibility to give support measures to promote organisational learning with relevant tools, learning arrangements and facilitation;
  4. the possibility to promote wider transfer  to other contexts by sharing knowledge and experiences.

When looking back at the history of the Work Process Knowledge network, it became apparent that the phase of the TSER-network was a unique opportunity to provide such a Europe-wide conceptual, transnational and inter-sectoral overview. In the next phase, the follow-up project focused on one branch – the chemical process industry – which was beneficial for becoming more concrete. Yet, the counter-side was the gradual particularisation regarding sectoral aspects and the size of companies. Also, the shift of emphasis brought the management perspective on organisational learning to the centre of interest.

When looking at present, it is apparent that the new presence of Internet, Web 2.0 technologies and mobile technologies open up several working issues of the network in new light. (This became apparent in the other LL sessions in the conference). When looking at the newest technologies that overshadow the construction sector (e.g. “Internet of things”, 3D-printing with new materials, Building Information Modelling (BIM)), there are other challenges that are similar to the ones already discussed by the network at an earlier stage.

Interestingly enough, in the Opening Colloquium Karen Evans raised three main points for looking at past and present and how to draw conclusions for the future:

  • Making VET research robust (awareness of conceptual and methodological grounds but being open for new issues),
  • Making VET research more dialogue-oriented (research, development and practice working together),
  • Making VET research more comparative (both system level, organisational level and in historical terms).

I think this is enough of the opening session. The main contributions of the LL project were in two other sessions – the symposium “Construction 2.0″ and the research workshop on “Interactive research”.

More posts to come

Why can't you comment on this post? #indieweb

OLDaily - 7 Septiembre, 2014 - 22:58
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Ben Werdmuller, Benwerd, [Sept] 07, 2014

OK, so I've played around with this a bit and think I've figured it out. It's what I think my Referrer System, which I built in 2002, would have become had it grown up (it peaked at 800K hits per day, and I didn't have the resources to sustain that). The idea here is that, if you read something and you want to comment, you comment on your own page, not the page you're reading. Then what happens is that your system sends the other system a notification saying you've added a comment (you can also send it manually). The other system can then do whatever it wants with that notification (a typical use would be to list your comment along with others under the article). None of the documentation I've seen so far is particularly clear (and as usual there us no Perl reference code). Here's an  explanation and code from Ben Werdmuller,  here's more from Indieweb, and here's a service that (confusingly) supports it called Bridgely. I hope it's successful, because it creates a distributed web, not one centralized on social networks.

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POSSE

OLDaily - 7 Septiembre, 2014 - 22:58
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Unattributed, Indie Web Camp, [Sept] 07, 2014

During my  recent talk I discussed the POSSE model, which describes owned, bought and earned media(POSSE = produced, owned, seeded, social, earned). I now realize that what Diego Leal was looking for was this: "POSSE is an acronym/abbreviation for Publish (on your) Own Site, Syndicate Elsewhere. It's a Syndication Model where the flow involves posting your content on your own domain first, then syndicating out copies to 3rd party services with perma(short)links back to the original version."

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Something is rotten in the state of…Twitter

OLDaily - 7 Septiembre, 2014 - 22:58
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Bonnie Stewart, The theoryblog, [Sept] 07, 2014

"Will my dissertation end up being about the Twitter that  was, rather than whatever it is in the process of becoming?" Bonnie Stewart looks at the decline of Twitter not just as an isolated event but as part of a wider pattern. "Twitter As We Knew It (TM) as a representation of an era, a kind of practice. At the core, it is about the ebbing away of networked communications and  participatory culture," she writes. But more: "The sense of participatory collective – always fraught – has waned as more and more subcultures are crammed and collapsed into a common, traceable, searchable medium." Image: The Atlantic, A Eulogy for Twitter.

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Is there a Canadian market for American online programs?

OLDaily - 7 Septiembre, 2014 - 22:58
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Tony Bates, online learning and distance edcuation resources, [Sept] 07, 2014

Really good article from Tony Bates that comprehensively answers the question in the title. It begins with a dead-on accurate remark about hiring consultants, and then explains why the Canadian higher education market is what they call 'mature': costs are lower in Canada than the U.S., Canadian education is already high quality, and most every Canadian already has access to the learning they need ("51% of Canadians go on from high school to university, and 60% to some form of publicly-funded post-secondary education"). Conversely, Canadian universities face significant barriers marketing in the U.S.: "the U.S. accreditation system is byzantine and bizarre, and totally ill-adapted to the move to online, distance education." Also, "many U.S. citizens don’ t even know where Canada is, let alone know whether the University of Waterloo is a bona fide institution."

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